Kilt FAQ's 
Just click on the question to find your answer! 


Q. I'm not sure I have a family tartan, how do I find out?
Q. What if I don't have a clan? Can I still wear tartan?
Q. How much does a kilt cost?
Q. What style of kilts are available?
Q. What does pleated to SETT and to the STRIPE mean?
Q. What do I wear under my kilt?
Q. How long does it take to make a kilt?
Q. What style of jacket and accessories should I wear with my kilt?  
Q. Should I dry clean my kilt - how do I clean it?

Q. I'm not sure I have a family tartan, how do I find out?
 First, we do a name search to see if your family name is associated with one of the Highland Clans. Each Highland CLAN has one or several tartans associated with it. You may wear the Clan tartans associated with your name. Larger clans also included independent families with a different surname. These families are called SEPTS and are entitled to wear the tartan of the Clan whose protection they are under. In Scotland, there are several DISTRICT tartans and you may wear the tartan representing the region your family is associated with. 

Q. What if I don't have a clan? Can I still wear tartan?
 Most definitely you can! There are many 'Universal' tartans anyone can wear such as Black Watch, Celtic Pride, Braveheart, Jacobite and Spirit of Scotland. Many businesses, sports clubs and associations have their own tartan. In addition, countries and cities all over the world have commissioned tartans. We're sure there will be one for you!

Q. How much does a kilt cost?
That depends on the tartan you want, some tartans are classified RARE and therefore more expensive. It also depends on the weight of the fabric. Tartan is woven in a light weight 10oz. cloth suitable for kids and ladies clothing, a 13oz. middle weight is the most popular kilt weight. It is suitable for warmer climates like our Southern Ontario temperatures in the Summer months! Heavier weight 16 and 20oz are traditional choices for Pipe Bands and the Military.
Finally, kilts are priced according to your measurements and style of kilt you'd like to have.

Q. What style of kilts are available?
We produce a Traditional 7-8 yard kilt, suitable for formal occasions and a Casual 5 yard kilt suitable for sporting and leisure occasions. Again, the yardage depends on your measurements. Larger gents kilts require more fabric. Either style can be pleated to the SETT  (see next question) or to the STRIPE (see next question).

Q. What does pleated to SETT and to the STRIPE mean?
A kilt pleated to the SETT means that the fabric is pleated at the back in such a way that the pattern in the tartan is repeated all the way around. Pleated to the STRIPE means that the dominant stripe in the tartan is centered in each pleat.

Q. What do I wear under my kilt?
I was waiting for this one! This is a much debated question. Some kilt wearers insist that underwear must be worn, others insist that wearing anything but your kilt goes against tradition. Indeed, for several military regiments the non-wearing of underwear is a regimental rule! Either way, those who wear the kilt have their own preferences and don't worry too much about who or who doesn't wear underwear! So, to the oft asked "What's under your kilt?", the Scots often answer - "Scotland's future!".

Q. Should I dry clean my kilt - how do I clean it?
Another much debated question! You could but…you also risk that your kilt may never be the same. Harsh chemicals can damage and discolor the wool fibers. Commercial pressing will alter the lushness of the wool fibers. There are other options- use a nappy wipe to spot clean. It works very well. If your kilt needs a good cleaning, fill your bathtub with about 6" of warm water, add a capful or two of Woolite and swish the water around to evenly distribute the soap. Gently lay your kilt down flat in the tub and let it sit like that for an hour or so. Then, move your kilt around gently. Drain the tub. Leave the kilt in the tub - it still has lots of soap in it. Fill the tub with 6" of water again. Don't add any more soap. Swish the kilt around to get the soap out. Drain and repeat the whole procedure until the water is clear after you've swished. Use a clip hanger and hang the kilt over the tub to dry. When it is completely dry, lay an old sheet on the floor and open up the kilt. Align the pleats and press with a damp cloth. Press down firmly. Follow with a another firm press using plain brown paper to get all the moisture out. Press the inside of the kilt and then the outside and you're done. Easy...and your kilt will look terrific!

Q. How long does it take to make a kilt?
8-10 weeks in most cases. If you're in a rush we'll do our best to meet your deadline.

Q. What style of jacket and accessories should I wear with my kilt?
For those formal black tie occasions with the Traditional kilt you have several jackets to choose from, The Prince Charlie, Montrose, Sherrifmuir and Kenmore are appropriate to wear. Your shirt choice should be the classic Tuxedo wing tip worn with a black bowtie. If you wear a vest, don't wear a belt. Finish the look with a dress Sporran, cream argyle socks, flashes, Sgian Dhu tucked in the right sock and ghillie brogue shoes.

With the casual kilt, there are no rules but if you'd like to wear a jacket, you might choose a Harris tweed or Argyll. Jacobite shirts, military style shirts and wool pullovers are a nice choice for a casual look. Your Sporran should be all leather, socks can be colored, and as to footwear - again, no rules. Sandals, work boots, brogues…they can all work. 

  Hi Joyce! I finally got around to having the kilts you made for my son and daughter let out. You are brilliant! My friend Julie just couldn't get over how much thought you put into making their kilts! I would like to mention it in the yahoo group if that's ok and give your www.sonsanddaughtersofscotland.com a plug if you don't mind. 

William Kennedy Jr., Chieftain, Midwest US, Kennedy Society of North 
America and Moderator of 'For those who wear the Kilt'


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